Glooko, t:slim, and Dexcom = My Dream d-Data System

I remember using Glooko way back when I had the old iPhone 4s cable (I actually found it in one of my supply boxes yesterday) that connected to my freestyle meter. I honestly don’t know how long I’ve had that account, but I’m glad that I do.

glookoWhen I first had my t:slim, Glooko and mySugr were the two apps I kept my data in before t:connect was approved by the FDA. In a way, I hated it because I *had* to manually log everything. But, in a way, it was good because I had to pay attention to everything. I think that was the only time I had the lowest A1c ever because I had to think about it and manually log, so I kept everything in check regularly. But, I always liked their reports, and the app interface.

Now, Glooko has come a long way from how it looked back then. There is so much more to the app, and we can connect more things. I like that I can upload my Bayer Contour Next meter into the system with my Nexus tablet, and that I can set Glooko to pull my Dexcom data from the Dexcom “cloud” via my Apple Healthkit. They are also making strides to also include pumps into the upload process. Just recently, they were able to add the Omnipod and they’re working on a way to add the Medtronic pumps into the lineup.

I have gone back to logging and have downloaded my own reports just to see how they compare to other sites such as the t:connect and Diasend online apps. Honestly, I have to say, I like the Glooko app’s reports SO much better. They are simple yet comprehensive. They are easy to glance over or delve into – however you need them, they have it; they are the perfect combination.

With t:connect, you’re limited on the meters you’re allowed to upload with, and if you don’t use the t:slim G4, you can’t upload your Dexcom into the system – which I think is absolutely crazy. I like their reports too, but without Dexcom in it, I feel like I’m not getting the whole picture. I might would consider changing meters otherwise if they did, but they don’t, and I don’t think they will.

While I like Diasend (I don’t *love* it) because I can practically use any meter I want to use (a.k.a., my beloved Bayer Contour Next USB). Currently, Diasend does not pull data from Dexcom if you have the G5 – neither from the receiver itself nor the Dexcom Cloud if you are in the US, which I am. So since upgrading to the G5 system, I no longer have access to full-data reports, and I’m back at being as frustrated as ever.

Glooko App and tslimAfter seeing the Glooko reports, I really want Glooko to be my go-to web service for all of my diabetes devices. The reports are easy to read and understand, and don’t look like they are from 1990. Since I can’t manually log my basal rates and temp basals and things like that (they say it’s so that records stay consistent, yet I can manually log boluses…. which if I don’t, that would be an inconsistent record as well… so I don’t really follow that logic), I only get 3/4 of the picture. I want my t:slim to be able to upload so that I can get the full report. The reports look to be really comprehensive but I can’t take advantage of it until I can upload my pump.

So, with that being said, I’ve talked with people from Glooko and they are willing to work with Tandem if Tandem is willing to work with them. And, of course, this is something we have to bring up to the companies. Sometimes they will work on things a little faster if their customer base raises their voice and gives them a nudge.

When I called Tandem earlier this week, someone else had already called and put in a request too, so it’s something that not only I am wanting as well. If you don’t want to call them, that’s ok. There is a web form as well that you can fill out and request it – easy peasy.

So, ladies and gentlemen… can I ask a favor? If you use a t:slim, can you go online to Tandem’s contact form (or call and personally request it if you happen to have to call them anyway) and request that Tandem work with Glooko? Pleeeaase??? With a cherry on top?? Thanks!!

What I’ve Learned In 27 Years With Diabetes

Okay, so the end of last year was a blur to say the least. I only blogged once in November, and that was to say that I was determined to put diabetes back into my life. And I am. It’s taking a bit longer than usual, but I’m learning to balance all the things in my life that is going on while trying my best to keep from putting my diabetes on the back burner and leaving it there.

IMG_2019On the 22nd of November, I celebrated 27 years with Type 1 diabetes. Yes, you read that right. I celebrated it. I may not have written a whole post or had cake or thrown a party, but I did in my own mind, celebrate it. Having diabetes has taught me a lot of things, but namely, it has taught me to be thankful for the health that I do have. (And what a month to have to celebrate it in, right?!)

Many people think that I am crazy, but I count myself so blessed to be a diabetic in that it is one of the biggest things that has taught me to roll with the punches, to try my hardest, when the going gets tough to push harder, but that it’s okay to take a break and rest at times when burnout is at it’s peak. As crappy of a disease diabetes is, it has helped to shape me into the person I am today, and for that, I’m thankful.

It has taught me humility in knowing that I can’t do it all, all of the time. Diabetes is a sucky disease that I wouldn’t wish on anyone. But coming from someone who hates to ask for help for anything, it has taught me that sometimes I have to suck it up and ask, and not be embarrased to do so. It’s not just my life anymore that depends on my health, I have two beautiful children and a loving husband that depend on me as well. So, I have to tell my self to “suck it up buttercup” and ask for help when I need it.

And help doesn’t need to be constricted to physical help – I mean mental help as well. This disease is a 24/7 monkey that can wear at anyone, and asking for help from either a friend, professional, or both, is completely ok… in fact, I encourage it.

I’ve had to learn that even though I have diabetes and my pancreas does not work correctly, it doesn’t mean that I am broken. It took me years to not feel like I was broken, a dud, malformed… It took a very long time for me to realize that I’m still a person. I am not defined by the non-functioning status of an organ that is taking up residence in my body. It causes a lot of havoc at times, yes, but I am not my pancreas, nor am I the disease that caused it to be a bum. I am still the person who loves music, who loves to write, who is constantly paranoid about how clean or dirty her house is, or who is completely mesmerized by how quickly kids can grow and loves to kiss and tickle them every minute I can. I simply have one organ (well, technically two if you count my slacker thyroid) that doesn’t work.

cWC3VryQce5kbpXB.jpgAs a tech guru, I’ve been on many different pumps and used many different meters – and I used to be one to tell you which one I thought was the greatest thing to ever hit the market in my opinion at that time. Now, my thoughts have changed a bit to moreso encourage people to do a lot of research on their own. It’s true that what works for me may not work for you – and what works for us, may not work for the person next to us. All pumps have their drawbacks, and so do all meters. No one fits everyone, and it’s a great thing that we have all of these options on the market. I will still give you pointers and tell you pros and cons if asked, but for the most part, I’ve learned that even with diabetes, each one of us has a different experience so what I say works for me will more than likely be completely different for you and your needs.

I’ve also learned that diabetes is ever evolving… even in me, it’s constantly morphing, and to me, as someone who has loved the human anatomy, it astounds me. Even as frustrating as it is to constantly have to monitor and adjust, just to see how my body and insulin needs has changed and waved through insulin sensitivity to insulin resistance and all areas in between through 2 pregnancies and just regular life – it’s just utterly amazing to me. And that is one reason why I will never tell anyone how to manage their diabetes. Heck, I can’t keep up with mine most of the time, so I have no place pointing fingers or telling someone else what they should do or how they should do it in regards to their own personal diabetes management.

Let Your Light Shine

In the end, I am a person that happens to have a bum pancreas (and thyroid)… but I’m thankful for all that having it has taught me and for shaping me into who I am today.

It is my goal and passion to at least try to help others and encourage them in their own diabetes journey – whether you’ve lived with it one day, one year, or too many years to count.

Dexcom G5 – A Month Later

So, I’m finally getting to write some of my thoughts around the Dexcom G5 Mobile system. While I do see it as an upgrade to the G4, I don’t see it as a must-have.

Unlike when we went from the Seven+ to the G4, there wasn’t a huge hardware change other than the transmitter is now Bluetooth and can talk to a phone without the constant need of a receiver. However, notice I said “constant” need. There are times when the phone seems to not pick up signal very well for me, even when I’m holding my phone not even 2 feet away from the transmitter. Other times, it’s great at picking up signal. Mostly, I lose signal at night, so I keep my G5 receiver by my bed or in my bed with me. Otherwise, I will take it with me if we’re going on a long trip just so I know if my phone dies, I have a backup. I tend to stash it in my bra under my arm in the band so it has a comfy home. I’m used to storing my pump there when I wear a dress, so it’s no big deal to keep it there too.

On the side of whether or not the signal length is shorter or longer, technically, they both were rated to have signal for up to 20 feet – however, the G4 seemed to get much greater distance than that. I guess I got spoiled. Now it seems I have to almost always have my phone attached to my hand or butt (it stays in my back pocket mostly).

It is pretty nice to be able to have my Dexcom in my phone though when I have to make a quick trip somewhere – just grab the phone, ID and debit card and go.

And I like that when I calibrate on my phone, it carries over to the receiver when I get in range of it. No need to calibrate both devices, and both devices also show the same sensor glucose value. Now, with that being said, I wish that they synced missing data between the two when they were in range. So, if I’m out of range of my receiver for a while, it would fill in gaps from my phone.. and vice-versa.

I almost miss my G4 at times, simply because I don’t like having to use the Follow app to view the data on my Apple watch. I like that there is a separate app for the Share2 app. It seems they could make the Share2 app fill-in the gap like it used to do when the receiver was out of range and then brought back in range for the G4.

I ran both the G4 and the G5 side-by-side for a week as many were stating they felt they were getting better accuracy (Need a diabetes device guinea pig? Call me!). I even did myself. But, after watching it on both screens and calibrating with the same numbers, they were both relatively the same over time, so I don’t really feel one was more accurate than the other (unless you were going from the pediatric version of the G4, which did not have the 505 software, to the G5 which does – then, yes, I could see that being more accurate).

As far as the Clarity app, I still don’t like it. But, one thing I saw a lot of people having an issue with was the Estimated A1c and feeling that it could be off from their actual A1c. Two things come to mind with this – 1) they’re not really supposed to exactly match because what Clarity gives you is a rough estimate based on your sensor average… which leads me to…

2) (yes, I feel I need a separate paragraph for this one) Your estimated A1c and estimated sensor average are only going to be as accurate as your meter. I know, I know, a lot of people say that if the FDA approved it, it’s accurate enough. I call baloney. I’ve done my own testing of several meters on the market, as well as several other people, and I’ve read many different charts with statistics of different meters available, and I personally have chosen the Bayer Contour Next line of meters for my own peace of mind. Why? It’s not about testing them against each other with the same drop of blood for me, but how they test when ran two or three times back to back. If I have a meter that runs numbers of 136, 178 and 154 in succession, then I tend to raise an eyebrow. However, if I find one that runs 136, 131 and 138 in succession for three drops, it tends to make me feel more confident about the readings that meter is giving me when testing just one drop for a bolus. Out of all of the ones I’ve tried, the Contour Next brand worked better and had tighter deviations, so it’s what I’ve stuck with. But, as always, I’m not a medical doctor or medical scientist, so my own thoughts and testing are simply to appease me. Don’t take my word for it – if you’re curious, do your own testing and research.

And, back to Clarity and the A1c Estimation and the actual A1c correlation… here’s mine:

Clarity vs actual A1c

All in all, the G4 is still a good, solid, reliable product. The G5 is more a convenience system that gives you options. And options are good. 🙂

Putting Diabetes Back Into My Life

Wow. It’s been 3 months since I blogged?! What?!?! I guess that’s how things go when you’re stretched at every end it seems between a baby, toddler, and a house to keep up with. I’m busy, but happily so. I’ve not had much time to think about blogging as it seems my day is full from the moment I get up to the moment I go back to bed. Some days are overwhelming but most are just full and things like blogging have taken a backseat.

So, if you are wondering how we’re all doing, we are good. The hubs is staying busy, baby A is growing (she’ll be 5 months old soon!) and E is quickly growing into a little boy rather than a toddler. Baby A is rolling over and already has 2 teeth (!!!), and E is in pre-k learning and filling his mind with all sorts of awesome things (Hey moma! Apples grow on TAAAAAAAAAAAALLL trees!).

Me? eh. I’m “here” most days. I get so wrapped up in what is going on around me that I forget “me” and, most of all, my diabetes. I’ve let things go so much that I don’t even want to remotely know what my A1c is right now. I realize that I can’t expect to be perfect with it, but I also know that I can’t let my control go. My husband and kids depend on me to be healthy, and I feel like I’m having more and more “episodes” and am not healthy any longer. My body is tired and worn out from the rollercoaster caused by my own “backburner” attitude I’ve had. I’ve just not had the time I had before baby A to sit down and upload. I used to think I would like to have a system of remote uploading for convenience sake, but now, it would be an absolute dream to upload everything with no wires, on-the-go, from all devices, and get instant feedback. That’s one thing I do love about Glooko’s updates to their app because while I can’t plug my pump into it, I can have my Dexcom data plugged into it from HealthKit and I can upload my Contour Next USB into my android tablet and at least get feedback that way by seeing comparisons between weeks, months, etc. I looked at it earlier this week – my average BG is almost 170. Yep. And while that may not be a big deal to some, it’s a huge deal to me since I usually keep a tighter, lower range goal.

I feel like I’ve let myself go too much and it’s time to get back. And what got my head back into the game after having E was blogging. It was my way of working things out in my head because rarely do I go back through and edit – I simply blog out what’s in my head and get better clarity of where I stand and what I need to do.

And this is the one, constant truth. As selfish as it may seem to put myself first, it’s really not because if I don’t it’s also not putting my family first. My health directly impacts them and my ability to take care of them, and I can’t take care of them if I am too sick to do so. So, putting me and my care first, is actually putting them first… and then you realize that there are no placeholders, only the ones we’ve created, and we’re all just one unit.. your family unit.

The time has come for me to put diabetes care back into my life and to stop “winging” it.

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Long time, no blog… The big update.

I promise it has not been intentional to not be consistent or to be absent in blogging. Things were becoming increasingly busy near the end of my pregnancy trying to prepare for the baby, which proved to be a needed thing because I actually went into labor on Father’s Day weekend.

Yep. Totally unexpected. I even had an OB check-up the Thursday before and there was absolutely NO sign of her coming early. I knew my pelvic bone felt as if she had shifted down, but my OB said he didn’t think she had dropped, and that labor did not seem to be any time soon. Yeah, right. My body thought otherwise. Late Friday night / early Saturday morning, I started having contractions. Not bad, but stronger than normal, and only a few of them. I went off to bed with no problem other than the usual hip/pelvic pain that I had all throughout my pregnancy. Saturday morning, we went shopping for the weekend and for things for the next week (food, etc). Halfway through the shopping trip, the contractions were very strong, but not consistent. I thought maybe it was the pelvic pain from walking as long as I had been. Activity was not something I could do without major pain anyway, and this was just over the top. All I wanted to do was to go home and rest in my recliner and wait for the contractions to ease too – because, ya know.. they just had to be Braxton-Hicks since I was no where NEAR ready for labor right?? Ha. They stayed steady all.day.long. And into the night. By that evening, I told my husband we had better go just to get checked since the contractions were then becoming about 4-5 minutes apart.

After a 2 hour stay at the hospital (SUPER strong contractions, but no dilation… only a half centimeter!!), I was sent home with a cocktail shot in my hip to make me sleepy and to ease the pain (which made me super drunk and sleepy, but did NOTHING to ease my pain)… and some juice, crackers and peanut butter because my BG was dropping… which wasn’t usual.

All day Sunday (Father’s Day), I had contractions. I stayed in bed or in my recliner and simply kept a watch on my contractions, and took warm baths to help ease some of the pain. We went to bed that night and by 1am, I was crying and moaning through the contractions. Something HAD to be happening. We went in and I had dilated to maybe 1 cm.

O. M. G… Seriously?!? Yes… Seriously. And they were going to send me home again. I fought against it. By the end of that two hour wait, I was so uncomfortable. I couldn’t sit any longer. Walking helped, but not much. The contractions made the pelvic pain so much worse than I felt I could stand. Finally, the nurse came in once again an hour later to tell me my options and insisted that she check me. I also believe she tried to ‘help’ the dilation along because I had gone from that measly 1cm to 4cm. She called my OB and came back  and said “Congratulations, you just booked yourself a c-section at 7:30am!”

I cried. I was so ready to not be in pain, but was so unsure if she was ready since I had JUST made it to 37 weeks that morning.

My section was bumped to 9:30 due to an emergency one. By then, I had no idea how much further I had dilated, but there was no going back. I knew it. The pain was VERY intense, and I shook, cried, and moaned uncontrollably through contractions. I wish now that I had an idea of how far I had dilated just for curiosity’s sake.

Funny thing about c-sections, once they begin – it’s super fast and over before you know it. I was wheeled in and being prepped at 9 and by 9:35, I heard the cries of my little girl. And this time, I got to see her because they took the blue sheet down far enough for me to see as the doctor suctioned her and cut the cord.

And just like that, I had 2 kids. One, so happy to be a big brother, and the other just as happy, content and healthy as could be to be out of her cramped living space and out in the world. She was perfectly healthy with only a dip in BG after birth that was brought back up with some formula while I recovered with no NICU time.

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As far as my BG the whole time? I owe a HUGE thank you to the Nightscout team – both for the push to get Dexcom to release Share and for them to have the Pebble app be able to get the info from my Share account so that I could be monitored VERY closely with just a glance by my husband at his watch, and my Dexcom and phone be tucked away in his pocket. Oh, and the medical staff was super impressed ( nurse: “hey, what’s her BG?” husband: “136” OB while cutting me open: “awesome!”… yeah… that’s pretty darn awesome!!)

Third and Twice

For most of the pregnancy calendars I’ve looked at, this week ( number 27) marks the beginning of my third trimester… or either the last week of the second. I’m going with the first of the third because of simple math reasons (40/3=13.3, so TECHNICALLY 26w6d would be the shifting point). Either way, I’m now in what they call “the home stretch” and I’m very happy to be.

Don’t get me wrong, the ability to be pregnant and feel a little one moving around inside of you is pretty darn awesome. From her kicks and jabs to just simply rolling around, it all amazes me and makes me so excited to imagine what she looks like. But there have been a lot of differences with this one – mostly I’ve had a lot more pain throughout this pregnancy, and I’m ready for it to be over.

One thing that is not very different and knew would be coming on full force sometime soon was the lovely insulin resistance. It’s like I was telling a lady friend the other day who was talking about how she hates the monthly resistance that comes before the week of her period. Pregnancy is the same way, except it’s a cycle that lasts 9 months. The third trimester is like the third week of that month where insulin resistance hits and makes no sense but you have to roll with it – except it lasts for about 10 or so weeks and increases with vengeance. I think I made adjustments two or three times last week. And I’m already very close to being at twice the insulin intake that I was pre-pregnancy. I have to remind myself that I’m not doing anything wrong and that I’m not a bad or irresponsible diabetic – I just need more insulin. When I have to bolus and what would normally have been only 3 units, tops, is now close to 7, I have to mentally keep myself from feeling bad and just realize that it is what it is because of my current state of pregnancy.

Looking at the overall picture though, I’m doing very well with this pregnancy just as I did with my first, and that’s what I’m most thankful for. I’ve been bumped up to 2-week visits now and will start that lovely Fetal NST (non-stress testing) visits twice-weekly when I’m 30 weeks along. Yay. 🙂

 

Getting Closer To A Decision

It’s no secret that I am someone who can’t seem to make up their mind when it comes to diabetes devices. Granted, I have (according to my Countdown app) 19 more months until my current t:slim pump warranty expires, so I do have some time to mull over this – which is a good thing. I don’t think that choosing a pump should be a quick decision for anyone, nor should it be one that a doctor should make for you – one should have the time to research all available options and to do as much research as possible. You are sorta “stuck” with the decision you make for a while – at least 4 years, 5 years for some, if insurance paid for it, so it needs to be a good one. And it should be one that you listen to your gut about as well.

I do have a Medtronic pump and while I have no issues with the pump itself in how it fits into my life – I do have issues with their CGM system and prefer Dexcom whole-heartedly over it. I’m not saying it’s a bad system, just that it doesn’t work for everyone and I’m one of those people. Which brings me to my next point.

Seeing as how they (Medtronic) will probably never answer the clicking of my ruby slippers and wishful thinking and offer a pump that also integrates with Dexcom, I’ll always have two separate data systems to look at when viewing my data. My endocrinologist works very closely with me and allows me to make tweaks as I see that they need to be done. He knows that I fully understand how my pumps work and also knows that I have taken time to study how my body works. And until this pregnancy, I never really cared about the data being separate. Now? It’s a huge deal to me. Maybe I’m losing my touch or I just don’t have the time to upload and analyze like I did before, but the separated systems irritated me to the point that I stopped making my own tweaks. And while I absolutely LOVE my endo to pieces, his office is busier and he doesn’t always have the time to get back with me.

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So, I’ve made a big part of my decision. Any system that I use HAS to upload to Diasend for Dexcom integrated reports. I don’t care whether the Dexcom is integrated into a pump at this point because I have the Dexcom Share receiver and it fits me and my needs better than having it integrated into a pump would.

I also know how my particular insurance works, so I also know that pumps that are partly disposable (ie, the Snap by Asante and the Omnipod by Insulet) will not be choices in my line-up due to on-going costs. I totally get that up-front, it’s cheaper, but I’d rather pay more upfront and have lower monthly costs than commit to a pump that I may not be able to afford supplies for. These pumps are good pumps as well, but for me, it’s a financial factor that’s swaying me.

And, to go back to Medtronic’s system for just a minute, cost is a factor there too. While I could just go back and order a Revel pump still and use the Dexcom separate – why would I want to get a pump that I know I’m not going to use it for it’s full functionality? It’s sort of a waste of money if you ask me, and not an option I can bring myself to choose.

So, that leaves me with either:

  • Tandem again (which hopefully their new t:slim G4 will be available and the upgrades they make to other things in the pump – like reverse correction – will make it better, though I’m sort of leery about going back with them after all of the problems I’ve had with that particular pump),
  • Accu-check – though I’m not a fan of having to use their dedicated remote for bolus calculations since it’s not built into the pump, and you have to use the integrated meter to even use the bolus calculator (you can’t input a manual reading to base it off of like you can with other systems), or
  • Animas – which seems to be a strong contender as I do like their Ping and I’ve honestly not had any issues with the pump or customer service from them, and it also works with Diasend. Plus, the Ping has a remote to bolus with, with FULL calculations, not just an “easy-bolus” of a pre-determined amount.

In short, I’ve made a decision really to stick to Dexcom, Diasend, and one of those three pumps. It’s just deciding which one of those now that I’m left to make the choice between, which I’m sure I’ll continue to think and weigh options between them over the next few..okay, several… months.

One Year Since…

Today marks one year since possibly the scariest day I’ve ever faced in my life of living with diabetes. It has been an emotional week leading up to it and I’m sure I may catch myself having moments today as well. As I look back, I remember and feel the fear and the feeling of failure that I faced that day just as raw as ever.

It was the day I woke up and couldn’t see anything but light and darkness out of my left eye.

Since then, I have gone through dealing with three different diagnosis’, with the final one being a macro aneurysm that dissipated before the vessel could burst. The fluid from the swelling was what caused the temporary vision loss, and without it, I would have never known it even happened. The final diagnosis was both a blessing and a wake-up call. I was blessed in that it didn’t burst, it was a wake-up call that I needed to (1) find a new doctor and (2) stop getting so stressed about everything and to be thankful for everything.

image (3)I’ve been one to try to be positive about things in life, especially my diabetes. The Serenity Prayer says it best – “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change…”. I cannot change the fact that I have diabetes. I cannot change the fact that after 26 years, there is a much higher risk of developing complications. I cannot go back in time and change how horribly I took care of myself for so many years – especially those teen rebellion years. BUT, the next part? “…Courage to change the things I can…” – Yes, there are things I can change. I can continually do my best to take the best care I can of myself. And lastly, “…and Wisdom to know the difference”… We have to know that there are things we can and things we can’t change. There are sometimes things that no matter how much we try, will never make the situation better. We have to recognize them and learn to let it go.

Not too long ago, a post I had written was syndicated to DiabetesDaily about if I were to be cured, what would I miss? A few commenters on their Facebook page called me crazy for even thinking I’d miss anything about diabetes. I don’t blame them – if I hated diabetes as much as some do, I’d think the article was pure craziness. But you know, after all of this time, it’s one of those things I’ve had to come to accept – I cannot change that I do have diabetes, so while I do, I have to embrace it and try to find the positives from it. Is it hard? Yes. Do I have moments of utter anger and resentment for having this disease that I know will progressively cause damage to my body? Yes.  I still get angry. I still get upset. I still cry when no one is watching because I’ve taken all I can take for the time being and I need a break. But you know what? I also realize that I cannot stay in that mindset. I have to have it and move on because I cannot change the fact that I have diabetes.

What I can change, though, is my attitude toward it. And I can continually work on knowing when to just let go and move on.

It’s been a rough year, to say the least, but it’s been one filled with blessings. I can see, my eyes are healthy again, and most of all – the thing I thought would no longer be possible for me – I’m carrying the most precious gift God could have ever blessed me with, and we’ve continued to be healthy throughout the pregnancy.

Hope, Courage, Prayer, and Faith. It’s what it takes.

 

(I turn to music for a lot of things. This song helped me through some pretty dark times. )

Coordinating Devices with PumpPeelz

One little thing I like to do is design graphics. I piddle with it, mostly, so it’s not a big thing, but it gets my creative juices flowing and takes my mind off of other things that may be stressing me out.

So, I wanted to make a design to get a custom PumpPeelz made so that my Dexcom and Medtronic pump matched and looked cute. Crazy, I know, but that little bit of color and art makes having the devices not so mundane. So, I set out to make a design using a blank canvas in Photoshop and some “brushes” (some of them are more like stamps, like the ones I used). I also used color inspiration from my niece’s favorite show, Strawberry Shortcake. My favorite character is Cherry Jam because, well, she sings and her colors are pink (like, fuchsia pink), a purpley-tinged pink, white and purple. This is where I LOVE Adobe Color because I can pull the exact colors from the photo and use them in my design work in Photoshop. (okay, okay, enough about my geekiness…)

Scott was able to take my image that I sent him:

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And with it, he was able to make my matching skins:

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I love them.  And the purple almost matches the color of the pump too. And, since I really don’t like the pink that the Medtronic pumps come in (someone likened it to a naked mole rat once, so now that’s all I see with it!! hahaha!), this gives me a perfect mix of purple AND pink… a pink that I like.

Is this post about diabetes? Not necessarily. But I do believe that things that make us happy and creative around diabetes helps us to do better and be more encouraged to take better control of ourselves. And if a silly pump skin or Dexcom skin helps do that and also gives me a means to display my artwork, then hey, it’s all good. 🙂

So go and get creative. If we have to use these things to help us be healthy, why not get creative with them? No use in being drab all of the time, I say. (Unless that’s your thing… if so, go for it.)

 

If you like this design too and would like to have one like it, feel free to email me and I can let Scott know that you would like to purchase one. I don’t charge for the designs, so it would be the cost of a custom designed skin from PumpPeelz.