Dexcom G5 – A Month Later

So, I’m finally getting to write some of my thoughts around the Dexcom G5 Mobile system. While I do see it as an upgrade to the G4, I don’t see it as a must-have.

Unlike when we went from the Seven+ to the G4, there wasn’t a huge hardware change other than the transmitter is now Bluetooth and can talk to a phone without the constant need of a receiver. However, notice I said “constant” need. There are times when the phone seems to not pick up signal very well for me, even when I’m holding my phone not even 2 feet away from the transmitter. Other times, it’s great at picking up signal. Mostly, I lose signal at night, so I keep my G5 receiver by my bed or in my bed with me. Otherwise, I will take it with me if we’re going on a long trip just so I know if my phone dies, I have a backup. I tend to stash it in my bra under my arm in the band so it has a comfy home. I’m used to storing my pump there when I wear a dress, so it’s no big deal to keep it there too.

On the side of whether or not the signal length is shorter or longer, technically, they both were rated to have signal for up to 20 feet – however, the G4 seemed to get much greater distance than that. I guess I got spoiled. Now it seems I have to almost always have my phone attached to my hand or butt (it stays in my back pocket mostly).

It is pretty nice to be able to have my Dexcom in my phone though when I have to make a quick trip somewhere – just grab the phone, ID and debit card and go.

And I like that when I calibrate on my phone, it carries over to the receiver when I get in range of it. No need to calibrate both devices, and both devices also show the same sensor glucose value. Now, with that being said, I wish that they synced missing data between the two when they were in range. So, if I’m out of range of my receiver for a while, it would fill in gaps from my phone.. and vice-versa.

I almost miss my G4 at times, simply because I don’t like having to use the Follow app to view the data on my Apple watch. I like that there is a separate app for the Share2 app. It seems they could make the Share2 app fill-in the gap like it used to do when the receiver was out of range and then brought back in range for the G4.

I ran both the G4 and the G5 side-by-side for a week as many were stating they felt they were getting better accuracy (Need a diabetes device guinea pig? Call me!). I even did myself. But, after watching it on both screens and calibrating with the same numbers, they were both relatively the same over time, so I don’t really feel one was more accurate than the other (unless you were going from the pediatric version of the G4, which did not have the 505 software, to the G5 which does – then, yes, I could see that being more accurate).

As far as the Clarity app, I still don’t like it. But, one thing I saw a lot of people having an issue with was the Estimated A1c and feeling that it could be off from their actual A1c. Two things come to mind with this – 1) they’re not really supposed to exactly match because what Clarity gives you is a rough estimate based on your sensor average… which leads me to…

2) (yes, I feel I need a separate paragraph for this one) Your estimated A1c and estimated sensor average are only going to be as accurate as your meter. I know, I know, a lot of people say that if the FDA approved it, it’s accurate enough. I call baloney. I’ve done my own testing of several meters on the market, as well as several other people, and I’ve read many different charts with statistics of different meters available, and I personally have chosen the Bayer Contour Next line of meters for my own peace of mind. Why? It’s not about testing them against each other with the same drop of blood for me, but how they test when ran two or three times back to back. If I have a meter that runs numbers of 136, 178 and 154 in succession, then I tend to raise an eyebrow. However, if I find one that runs 136, 131 and 138 in succession for three drops, it tends to make me feel more confident about the readings that meter is giving me when testing just one drop for a bolus. Out of all of the ones I’ve tried, the Contour Next brand worked better and had tighter deviations, so it’s what I’ve stuck with. But, as always, I’m not a medical doctor or medical scientist, so my own thoughts and testing are simply to appease me. Don’t take my word for it – if you’re curious, do your own testing and research.

And, back to Clarity and the A1c Estimation and the actual A1c correlation… here’s mine:

Clarity vs actual A1c

All in all, the G4 is still a good, solid, reliable product. The G5 is more a convenience system that gives you options. And options are good. 🙂

2 thoughts on “Dexcom G5 – A Month Later”

  1. Such a valid point in #2; not so much about CGM, but about meters in general. I think people tend to overlook that; but when doing two finger sticks in succession to calibrate a new Dex sensor, it becomes apparent.

    As for Clarity, I find it more of a “how am I doing?” gauge than a “how can I do better” tool. And the estimated A1c is only based on a two week average, and if you run on a good week/bad week cycle, that number may not be so close to your 3 month average. (But I just had my blood drawn for A1c this morning, so it won’t be long before I see how well they match)

  2. I had diabetes burnout and gave up in all technology for 6m. Endo suggested g5. I’m Gadget Girl I jumped on it. Transmitter life 6 weeks vs 6 months on g4. Not happy. Range as a tennis pro was 40 feet on g4, now less than 20. Night time as blogger says mostly out of range. I like having readout on phone but disappointed with the rest.

Tell me what you think!