First Impressions of the 530G

While I’m not officially using the pump and CGM to it’s full ability, I wanted to shed some light on how things are going so far in the 530G pumping world.

As far as the pump functions go, I really don’t see much difference between the 530G system and the Revel. There are some minor changes throughout the system, but overall, if you’re used to the Revel system, then the pump side of the 530G will be no surprise to you. I’ve been using it since I got it as a pump system, and haven’t had any issues, save for a motor error, which after a long trouble-shooting call with Medtronic, deemed it unsafe to use and I had a replacement by the next morning (and a Saturday morning at that, too!). Transferring information over from the Revel to the 530G was super easy to do, and once I did, I packed up my Revel and sent it in for the credit on the upgrade cost.

IMG_6853The biggest upgrade with the pump is the CGM component along with the Threshold Suspend feature (which I will refer to as TS from here on out). The new sensors have a new device that hides the needle, and it inserts at 90 degrees instead of a 45 degree angle. The sensors are much thinner and honestly, feel no different than an infusion set going in. That was my biggest complaint with the SofSensors was that they hurt like the Dickens (what does that mean, anyway?) and out of the three day wear, I would only get one good day. The new sensors are touted to be much more accurate than the SofSensors anyway, but time will tell. I know there are studies out there that prove they aren’t as accurate as the Dexcom G4, and I have to agree – but only on the basis that getting one to actually last 6 days has been troublesome.

I have used 4 sensors so far, and three of them have failed. One was inserted into my abdomen because, you know, that’s the FDA approved place… but what wearing a 35 pound toddler on my hip/stomach sort of throws that out of the window because, honestly, you have to be sensitive with these sensors. When I pulled it out, it looked like an accordion. IMG_6854The next sensor looked great, but it died after 4 days. The third one died after one day. No amount of calibrating, not calibrating, protecting it, restarting it, nothing, kept that sensor alive. When I called in to see if I could have at least two of them replaced, they went through and troubleshooted (troubleshot?) a few things with me, and basically, the sensor is delicate, and needs to be worn where it won’t get knocked or pressed. And really? Who thought that would be a good idea? People are active and we don’t want to have to worry about babying a sensor device. I could be all sorts of rough and tumble with my Dexcom and didn’t have much issue at all. Finding such an area on my body that won’t be knocked by my son or pressed on when I sleep or sit is hard. But, with this last one, I may have found a good one because I don’t sleep on it and I can be more conscious about my son hitting/sitting on it. It’s on my upper thigh, right were my pocket is. I also learned (from YouTube) how to manually insert a sensor (hence the ability to take the picture of the contraption, less the pedestal in the above paragraph), so I’m not sure if that had anything to do with it or not, but so far, this one has lasted just over 5 days, and with incredible accuracy. My only wish is that they had kept the idea of a slanted angle insertion verses the straight in. I think it causes the sensor to be more vulnerable to kinking and accordion-ing, which makes me nervous.

As far a the new CGM insertion device goes, it was relatively simple to use, but you had to pay close attention to how you used it. My advice here is to just play with it a bit and watch it from the underside so you know what happens when and how you press the green button on the side. A VERY good video on how to use the inserter and insert an Enlite sensor is on YouTube as well. The nurse explains it very nicely and in an easy to understand manner.

I’m honestly not ready to use the TS feature yet. I did try it out and it did seem to work okay, but I quickly turned the feature off. As I haven’t been trained on it (nor the sensors, but inserting and using a sensor is a lot different in my mind than using a function on a device that could cut off my life liquid) and I have a lot of questions about it.

I am excited about this pump/CGM upgrade, even if I don’t use it for what they are calling it to be (Artificial pancreas? nope. But we won’t go there). It’s been nice not to have to carry around my Dexcom with me. Granted, the alarms on the Medtronic pump is irritating to say the least, but I’m glad they are because I won’t ignore them.

IMG_6855

 

I may come back later after I’ve used it and give a more in-depth view of it, and if things are going successfully, I’ll leave some tips that have helped me.

3 thoughts on “First Impressions of the 530G”

  1. Just a tip, you may find it helpful to add an extra piece of tape over the sensor. In my opinion, it provides added security to the sensor and my readings are more accurate.

  2. Thanks for your preliminary review and I hope things improve with the sensors. When I look at your photos with all of the different numbers, it’s a wonder that all T1’s aren’t certifiably insane!

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