Glooko, t:slim, and Dexcom = My Dream d-Data System

I remember using Glooko way back when I had the old iPhone 4s cable (I actually found it in one of my supply boxes yesterday) that connected to my freestyle meter. I honestly don’t know how long I’ve had that account, but I’m glad that I do.

glookoWhen I first had my t:slim, Glooko and mySugr were the two apps I kept my data in before t:connect was approved by the FDA. In a way, I hated it because I *had* to manually log everything. But, in a way, it was good because I had to pay attention to everything. I think that was the only time I had the lowest A1c ever because I had to think about it and manually log, so I kept everything in check regularly. But, I always liked their reports, and the app interface.

Now, Glooko has come a long way from how it looked back then. There is so much more to the app, and we can connect more things. I like that I can upload my Bayer Contour Next meter into the system with my Nexus tablet, and that I can set Glooko to pull my Dexcom data from the Dexcom “cloud” via my Apple Healthkit. They are also making strides to also include pumps into the upload process. Just recently, they were able to add the Omnipod and they’re working on a way to add the Medtronic pumps into the lineup.

I have gone back to logging and have downloaded my own reports just to see how they compare to other sites such as the t:connect and Diasend online apps. Honestly, I have to say, I like the Glooko app’s reports SO much better. They are simple yet comprehensive. They are easy to glance over or delve into – however you need them, they have it; they are the perfect combination.

With t:connect, you’re limited on the meters you’re allowed to upload with, and if you don’t use the t:slim G4, you can’t upload your Dexcom into the system – which I think is absolutely crazy. I like their reports too, but without Dexcom in it, I feel like I’m not getting the whole picture. I might would consider changing meters otherwise if they did, but they don’t, and I don’t think they will.

While I like Diasend (I don’t *love* it) because I can practically use any meter I want to use (a.k.a., my beloved Bayer Contour Next USB). Currently, Diasend does not pull data from Dexcom if you have the G5 – neither from the receiver itself nor the Dexcom Cloud if you are in the US, which I am. So since upgrading to the G5 system, I no longer have access to full-data reports, and I’m back at being as frustrated as ever.

Glooko App and tslimAfter seeing the Glooko reports, I really want Glooko to be my go-to web service for all of my diabetes devices. The reports are easy to read and understand, and don’t look like they are from 1990. Since I can’t manually log my basal rates and temp basals and things like that (they say it’s so that records stay consistent, yet I can manually log boluses…. which if I don’t, that would be an inconsistent record as well… so I don’t really follow that logic), I only get 3/4 of the picture. I want my t:slim to be able to upload so that I can get the full report. The reports look to be really comprehensive but I can’t take advantage of it until I can upload my pump.

So, with that being said, I’ve talked with people from Glooko and they are willing to work with Tandem if Tandem is willing to work with them. And, of course, this is something we have to bring up to the companies. Sometimes they will work on things a little faster if their customer base raises their voice and gives them a nudge.

When I called Tandem earlier this week, someone else had already called and put in a request too, so it’s something that not only I am wanting as well. If you don’t want to call them, that’s ok. There is a web form as well that you can fill out and request it – easy peasy.

So, ladies and gentlemen… can I ask a favor? If you use a t:slim, can you go online to Tandem’s contact form (or call and personally request it if you happen to have to call them anyway) and request that Tandem work with Glooko? Pleeeaase??? With a cherry on top?? Thanks!!

First Week With Dexcom G5 Mobile

G5 is here!After waiting 2.5 months, I finally received my upgrade transmitters for the Dexcom G5 Mobile system. To say that I was excited is an understatement. The thought of not having to carry around a receiver was pure bliss because honestly, I didn’t think I could lose my brain anymore than I did after my first kid and I was wrong – I literally could not find my nose if it weren’t attached. The balance of keeping order of all-things-diabetes in my life went out of the window, so I was leaving that receiver more places than ever. And if I kept it in my pocket, I would have that, phone and pump in various pockets and feel a bit tool-belt-ish.

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It’s true. Having my phone act as my receiver is liberating. I love only having to keep up with my phone. And my house is sort of small, so I can leave it in one central location most of the time and get signal most everywhere. But most of the time I have my phone with me for email, text, and baby-photo-op reasons, so that’s not an issue. The issue used to be that I was never near the receiver when the alarm sounded, and it would be at the most inconvenient of times, so it would get called all sorts of names and I would end up more frustrated than thankful most of the time. Now, it’s always with me since it’s built into the phone. Awesomeness.IMG_1169

The biggest thing I love about the app is now I can easily just tap in my BG calibration (NO SCROLLING – YAY!), and most of the time, I log my carbs and insulin now too. The app makes it easy to do, and seeing that blip helps. I also have used it to log my breast-pumping sessions so that I can figure out a better way to handle how it affects my BG by logging it as “light exercise”. I also like that the alert is shown with the actual BG number, not just “BG above ###”.

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I also love that my data is automatically stored into Dexcom Clarity, and accessing my report is as simple as opening the app, clicking a button, and viewing it. I can then email it to myself for in-depth review or just quick-glance over it when I have a couple of seconds free that I haven’t passed out from exhaustion.

Now, for the things that I don’t like or feel “meh” about:

The super private alert system. I think this is an area that should fall under “give us the ability and let us choose”. Personally, if I am being alerted of being high or low, I want to know what that alert number is WHEN I’m alerted, and not have to fumble with unlocking my phone first then opening the app. I want it to be an option that I can CHOOSE to turn on or off to see in that alert either “High Glucose Alert” or “High Glucose Alert – ###mg/dL”, and give us the option to open the app or dismiss the alert… which leads me to….

AW Alert

FOR HEAVEN’S SAKE PLEASE ALLOW US TO *ACTUALLY* DISMISS THE ALERT FROM WEARABLES OR EVEN THE LOCK SCREEN WITHOUT OPENING THE APP! This is my biggest pet peeve. If the above issue is solved where I choose to see my BG number and arrow within the alert, then also actually let me dismiss the alert when notified without having to open the app. I like the alert that comes up when you open the app, but it’s sort of pointless to me because I’m opening the app BECAUSE I’ve been notified, and I’m sure I’ll see the number once it’s open – no need to show a splash screen of sorts with it on there. I needed that BEFORE opening the app.

And along that same line – if I dismiss the alert from my watch, I shouldn’t still be notified every few minutes still from my phone. Especially since I’m required to have both the G5 mobile app and the Follow app to see it on my watch, and getting multiple alerts bugs the heck out of me. I get that the goal is to be sure to check the actual device for stale data, etc, but one would probably be keen to check if their BG remained static for hours on end. Heck, even instead of “dismiss”, let it be a “snooze” where you aren’t alerted seemingly every minute until you dismiss the actual alert. I would rather be able to “snooze” the alert for 10-20 minutes if needed rather than having that useless “Dismiss” option.

Follwing Friends

Overall, I like the Dexcom G5. I think it’s a big improvement, but I also think it’s a big step back. The jist of it is – let us *actually* dismiss from wearables, give us a separate app for those wearables for G5 (NOT the follow app for those of us who use it for ourselves and to follow others [which doesn’t sound creepy at alllll, right?]) (update: I hear there is a G5 mobile app for the Apple Watch in development, it just wasn’t ready when the G5 was approved by the FDA), and for all things mobile – LET US CHOOSE if our BG alert actually shows the BG or not.

I’m hoping to find a work-around until the G5 Mobile app comes to the Apple Watch since I have to use Follow currently. Possibly using only the alerts through the Follow app and turning off G5 Mobile alerts and simply using the G5 Mobile app as the loader? HHmm. I need some thought time on that one.

Check back later for an update! I’ll soon have my G5 receiver (I chose not to update my G4 one to use as a spare for the G4 transmitter), and I’m sure I’ll have some comments about that when I get it!

Putting Diabetes Back Into My Life

Wow. It’s been 3 months since I blogged?! What?!?! I guess that’s how things go when you’re stretched at every end it seems between a baby, toddler, and a house to keep up with. I’m busy, but happily so. I’ve not had much time to think about blogging as it seems my day is full from the moment I get up to the moment I go back to bed. Some days are overwhelming but most are just full and things like blogging have taken a backseat.

So, if you are wondering how we’re all doing, we are good. The hubs is staying busy, baby A is growing (she’ll be 5 months old soon!) and E is quickly growing into a little boy rather than a toddler. Baby A is rolling over and already has 2 teeth (!!!), and E is in pre-k learning and filling his mind with all sorts of awesome things (Hey moma! Apples grow on TAAAAAAAAAAAALLL trees!).

Me? eh. I’m “here” most days. I get so wrapped up in what is going on around me that I forget “me” and, most of all, my diabetes. I’ve let things go so much that I don’t even want to remotely know what my A1c is right now. I realize that I can’t expect to be perfect with it, but I also know that I can’t let my control go. My husband and kids depend on me to be healthy, and I feel like I’m having more and more “episodes” and am not healthy any longer. My body is tired and worn out from the rollercoaster caused by my own “backburner” attitude I’ve had. I’ve just not had the time I had before baby A to sit down and upload. I used to think I would like to have a system of remote uploading for convenience sake, but now, it would be an absolute dream to upload everything with no wires, on-the-go, from all devices, and get instant feedback. That’s one thing I do love about Glooko’s updates to their app because while I can’t plug my pump into it, I can have my Dexcom data plugged into it from HealthKit and I can upload my Contour Next USB into my android tablet and at least get feedback that way by seeing comparisons between weeks, months, etc. I looked at it earlier this week – my average BG is almost 170. Yep. And while that may not be a big deal to some, it’s a huge deal to me since I usually keep a tighter, lower range goal.

I feel like I’ve let myself go too much and it’s time to get back. And what got my head back into the game after having E was blogging. It was my way of working things out in my head because rarely do I go back through and edit – I simply blog out what’s in my head and get better clarity of where I stand and what I need to do.

And this is the one, constant truth. As selfish as it may seem to put myself first, it’s really not because if I don’t it’s also not putting my family first. My health directly impacts them and my ability to take care of them, and I can’t take care of them if I am too sick to do so. So, putting me and my care first, is actually putting them first… and then you realize that there are no placeholders, only the ones we’ve created, and we’re all just one unit.. your family unit.

The time has come for me to put diabetes care back into my life and to stop “winging” it.

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Until The End… At Least

Yesterday, I had my monthly appointment with my endocrinologist. I always look forward to my meetings with him – he’s always on top of everything to do with my diabetes, knows what a data nerd I am, and he fully trusts my decisions about my diabetes as much as I trust him to help me make decisions when I can’t.

He also knows that before my pregnancy, I switched pumps within my arsenal pretty regularly. He never had a problem with it. We even laughed about the amount of “backups” I have, even though all but one are out of warranty. When I received the second t:slim replacement in April of 2013 and started using it in January/February of 2014 after the cartridge recall and continued with it for a year until it was replaced earlier this month, he was impressed that I stayed with one that long. Last week, when I finally had enough of the craziness from my third replacement, he was willing to try to help because up until then, he (and I) was under the impression that I had found “the pump”.

So, when I went in yesterday, I told them about going to my Minimed once again (for documentation purposes), but this time I showed him the Dexcom reports between the two. He was floored just as much as I had been. Just as I had thought all along, he would expect to see that if I had switched insulin brands, not simply insulin pumps – because essentially they all should work relatively the same at delivering the set amounts of insulin. But the difference I had shown worried him. He told me not to use t:slim for the remainder of my pregnancy, and to stick to Medtronic. I had told him my husband and I discussed it and we had already planned to do that anyway, but hearing that from him validated it. And, in all honesty, it shocked me. He’s always been one to trust what decisions I make and go along with what I want to try, with the exception of ONCE telling me “no” to a medication I wanted to try, and this time I had the same reaction. He had stepped in and told me not to use a pump. Part of me is in shock, but partly not. It once again reassures me that he’s allows me to do what I want with my diabetes management, as long as it is within reason, and staying on a pump that would potentially cause harm would not be within reason, and he stepped in.

I will have add to all of this, though, that I did receive a call from Tandem at 10pm about replacing my t:slim once again. Since it is in warranty, that’s what I expect them to do. I went through all of the common questions they ask for record purposes, and the representative documented my answers. The replacement t:slim will be here next week, however both following doctors orders and for my own sanity, I will not be using it until the end of my pregnancy – or a bit later once insulin needs become somewhat predictable again. I’ll already lose some of my brain cells and energy to taking care of a newborn, and I won’t want to add switching pumps into the mix. He documented also that I wouldn’t be using the replacement until after August/September, so I wouldn’t be able to give feedback until then – and to my surprise, he didn’t try to pressure me into trying it any earlier. That made me feel very comfortable. I am glad that they reached out and were willing to replace the t:slim without hassle this time. I’ve only had a couple of sub-par experiences with their tech support, and the rest of the time it’s been good, so it does help to know that they are listening.

So, out of everything that’s happened this month, I am thankful to have an awesome Endo that I fully trust and that I know truly cares, and to know that Tandem does care – even at 10pm at night.

Studying and Tuning

Usually, about once a month, I study my Dexcom trends and make minor adjustments here and there in my insulin needs (with permission from my endocrinologist, of course). This ritual then becomes a weekly thing during pregnancy, and this time is no different. And, later in the pregnancy, I tend to do this every couple of days or so due to all of the increased resistance and stuff.

Since I switched back to my Medtronic pump after issues with the t:slim last week, I wanted to get a good few days of data before making any changes since typically you do have to make some adjustments between insulin pumps. Not all of them deliver in the same manner (though relatively the same, but juuuuuuust enough to possibly need minor changes in insulin dosing). Here’s what I mean:

6 days on tslim 2
6 days on the t:slim I had been using during the first part of my pregnancy…
6 days on the *replacement* tslim... NO changes in rates as they're the same brand of pump so it shouldn't have made a difference...
6 days on the *replacement* tslim… NO changes in rates as they’re the same brand of pump so it shouldn’t have made a difference…
...and the last 6 days since being on MedT with practically the same rates.
…and the last 6 days since being on MedT with practically the same rates.

If you compare the first and the last picture, you can see that there’s not entirely too much difference, and the average BG between the two was only a few mg/dL off from each other. The replacement, however, was whacko.

Either way, I’m doing a lot better on the MedT and will probably stay on it. And since I have made that decision, it’s time to get down to fine tuning things. I’m dropping every night around midnight, and it’s taking longer to treat them, thus I over treat and go high. BUT, the thing is, I’ve not corrected those highs. I’ve been trending back down on my own. So that tells me I have some work to do between supper, bedtime, and overnight basals and other factors.

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I usually look at my trends on the computer and try to identify things. If I think I see something or have a hunch, I’ll print out the Daily Trends report so that I can see the days individually and not as an average, and I’ll write my basal rates below it. This time (for example), I noticed that I dropped an average of 57mg/dL from my highest average to my evened out number when I wake up, which, ironically, is close to my insulin sensitivity factor (55mg/dL currently). So, I took the 1u and divided it by the number of hours it had been dropping  before leveling out, which was 7hours, and it came to 0.14, which I interpret that to be a needed basal rate change of 0.15u per hour less than what I have it set at now.  It all may not be exactly right, as most of what I think I’ve figured out is simply a hunch that I try out and see if it works. If not, I have record of my information pre-changes and I go switch everything back to what I had before.

This the stuff that goes through my head while I’m examining my data. This is why having as much of my data in one place is as crucial as air to me, especially while pregnant. It’s such a pain in the butt to have to look at multiple reports and have to spend more time organizing it than actually analyzing it. So, I’ve also resolved to leave my beloved Verio IQ and use the Contour Next Link meter that works with the pump, so that all of my data from the pump and meter at least are in the same place. That, and since using the CNL meter, my Dexcom data more closely matches it whereas it hardly ever matched my Verio. I’ve done a lot of research over the past couple of days, and it seems that maybe the CNL meter is a bit more accurate than the Verio, and with the Dexcom using the more accurate 505 software, maybe the two are just meant to be… Or I could just be completely off my rocker. 😉

So, I’m off to my endo tomorrow for my monthly checkup and to share my observations and changes with him.

(What I do and write here are in no way medical advice that you should ever take as such. I have worked very closely with my endocrinologist over the years and he has helped me learn how to do these things. If you want to learn how to manage and fine tune, please speak with your health care professional, as I am not one.)

 

Changes At The Half-Way

Typically, when one such as myself who is a device hoarder and who likes change becomes in a medical state where circumstances would favor more stable device use and more concentration on what is actually going on, one would stick to those devices no matter what and create a harmonious data record flow throughout the medical state.

My said state is, of course, pregnancy. A highly regulated and controlled medical state in those who are diabetic because both high blood sugars and wide variations in blood sugar control can cause damage to the developing baby. So, when I found out about this one, I resolved to stay on my t:slim pump, Dexcom CGM and Verio IQ meter – both because I was happy with my t:slim finally after having used it for almost a year without issue and for the sake of keeping consistent records. I had no concrete reason to switch back to another pump other than for my own sanity as I still didn’t 100% have faith in it. In all honestly, even though I had used it for the entire year without issues, I still -in the back of my mind- wondered when the issues would arise again. I held my breath with each cartridge change and said a prayer that it would work just fine. And it did… until earlier this month.

Granted, I know that being in the second trimester that insulin resistance would start to kick in, but there was a HUGE difference in my control after I had received my last replacement from Tandem on the 6th of this month. I was right back to fighting wild, crazy numbers from all ends of the spectrum without any rhyme or reason to them – and the only thing that had changed was the pump. And while I could call Tandem about it and have them replace my pump again, I just don’t have the mental energy to go through it again when even this last time was a bit challenging to get it replaced because the error I was getting was not a known problem and the pump had passed all other safety tests. I’m sure for other people, Tandem is a great company. I think they have a good product on their hands, but for some reason I just seem to not have luck with it for long.

Last week, when I had finally hit my breaking point – literally, I was sobbing Wednesday while contacting my Endo and letting him know I would be faxing records to him for help – I decided to go ahead and use my Medtronic pump. Crazy thing is, just for my own security of mind, I had just had it switched out from the 5 series (the 180u pump) for the 7 series (300u pump) to have as a “just in case” for the end of the pregnancy when insulin needs were going to be much higher. One of the issues with the t:slim seemed to be when I filled it up to 280, it would screw with the load sequence – thus the reason I had it replaced. Within a day, my BG’s became predictable again. I could bolus without skyrocketing and plummeting later – as if the insulin wasn’t being delivered. I could pre-bolus on a predictable schedule before eating again. And while I don’t like that now I can’t upload my pump and meter together so all of my data is messed up, I’m more at ease about my glucose levels overall. All from switching a pump.

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Saturday, I put my t:slim into sleep mode and packed it up and away. I do not plan to use it for the rest of my pregnancy, and even after that, I’m not sure if I’ll use it again. I’m absolutely torn about it because it was the first pump since my Disetronic way back in the day that I truly loved to use. But it’s like I’ve heard many other veteran pumpers say – I don’t care how fancy you make your pump, I just want it to deliver my insulin and work like it should. Especially right now.

Of course, this all is not to say you shouldn’t get the t:slim if you want it – there have been plenty of people who have used this pump since it came out without issue. I seem to be one of the lucky few who has had problems with it. Not every pump works for everyone, and you can’t go off of one person’s experience to assume what yours will be. 

And I know this is already a long post, but I want to give a shout-out to my Medtronic rep if he’s reading. He’s been so supportive of me through the past 4 years – no matter how many times I would switch pumps and go back to my Medtronic one, he was always there to help with whatever I needed. I can honestly say that I have never had a rep from any company be as good to me as he has, and I really appreciate that. So, a huge “Thank you” to Travis, especially this time for taking out a few moments on your day off (and on your way hunting, no less!!) to bring me a few sets that I needed until my order comes – you’re an awesome guy.

Frugality

I was discussing with my endocrinologist this week about how much I love the t:slim and all of it’s features except for one of the main components – the cartridge with its “bag” design rather than a syringe. The reason being is that even though they may tell you that the average loss of insulin is comparable to that of other pumps, I have done my own personal testing (seriously – like, removing excess insulin out of cartridges and tubings and measuring them) and the t:slim, for me, does waste a significantly larger amount of insulin by the end of a month’s run. I know this may not bother a lot of people, but it bothers me. It’s, as my endo calls it, the Great Depression syndrome.

photo (12)I’m not typically a extremely wasteful person, but I’m not exactly the all-about-reduce/reuse/recycling person either. If I recycle, it’s because I’m reusing sturdy plastic cups from restaurants or water bottles that I’ve bought and refilled just to save from paying another $1.50 for water. But when it comes to my supplies and insulin, I’m very frugal. I cannot stand to waste. The reason being is because when I had my prior job, I had an insurance plan with a very high deductible, no offer of an FSA plan, and NOTHING, not even prescription medications (meaning insulin too) was covered until that deductible was met. During those years, I had to skip seeing an endocrinologist and simply rely on whatever stock I had built up, and when that ran out, I paid the full cost to see a doctor to get a script for insulin that I knew would last at least another year, and I didn’t go back and see him again. Of course, it all went against insurance, but even with all of these costs, I would have never met that deductible. So, throwing out a cartridge that I know probably contains about 40u of insulin even though my pump says “0” drives me purely batty. And I know, you can just simply recover it and use it to fill the next tubing and all, but remember, I have a very active 3 1/2 year old who barely lets me get through a straight-forward cartridge change now, so adding another lengthy step to this process, well, it ain’t gonna happen.

But I’ve been entertaining the idea lately of going only slightly off-label. See, the tubing and insulin that I use are both approved for up to 6 days of use. Only the cartridge is approved for just 3 days. I’ve heard of others who fill and simply change out their sites every 3 days, I’ve just not taken that plunge myself. If it works, I could at least save an extra tube fill (roughly 22u) AND cut the “cushion” of about 40 to a per-site-average of 20u. That would cut my monthly loss by a good bit, and I could handle the waste a bit better then. I used to do the fill-cartridge-every-6-day thing and change-site-every-3-days back when I had my Disetronic H-tron+ pump. It was what I was taught to do, actually. So doing it now shouldn’t be an issue other than hoping the insulin doesn’t break down differently in the cartridge. My next change-out will be tomorrow, so I’ll try it then.

“But what about the un-used tubing?? Won’t you be wasting that?” Yes, but I’ve also done some research on that. See, a few years ago, you could get split-boxes – 5 complete sets of tubing and sites, and 5 site-only sets. Apparently, this wasn’t cost effective, and really, in the end, it didn’t save the customer money at all. My thoughts are – a customer can reuse tubing (although off-label), but sites, once they’re done, they’re done. So, sites are the most important part of the set anyway, so why lessen the charge? Granted, it seems the only company that still recognizes that people like to change just the site at times is Asante because you can order the Conset infusion sets in split boxes since you shouldn’t need to change the tubing but – you guessed it – every 6 days along with your pump body. The sites are to be changed out every three, so you get 4 or either 5 complete sets and 4 or 5 site-only sets. Lovely, isn’t it? But, since their sets are proprietary and not Luer-lock, there’s no use pining over them. Besides, I could just save up all of that extra tubing and make some art with it for Diabetes Art Day too, so it won’t technically be wasted. Wish me luck!!

 

So, what about you? Any other frugal pumpers out there?

Happy 2015!!… with some bullet points.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!… 13 days late….

So, apparently I have a thing now for only blogging twice a month? Well, rather than overwhelm with a very long post, I’ll just use some bullet points to bring out the most important things.

  • Diabetes is being rather weird. Some days, it seems I’m very insulin resistant, others I’m super sensitive. I don’t know if it’s simply diabetes being itself, or if pregnancy has a hand in it, or if my thyroid being wildy off recently plays a roll. Or it could be all three.
  • Speaking of the thyroid thing… my TSH came back above 5 on New Year’s Eve, up from a usual 1.3-1.5’ish. Not sure of the reason other than being pregnant, as this happened when I was pregnant with E, but either way, my Synthroid has been upped yet again, and we’ll recheck in a few months.
  • I’m now 14 weeks, 2 days today. Baby bump is in blooming, and while I’m excited, it’s also freaking me out. The whole going from one to two kids… The further I go, the more freaked I get. I’m sure it’s just a thing I’ll get past soon as my emotions are EVERYWHERE. We’ve also decided to go for an early gender ultrasound, so we’ll (hopefully) know on the last Saturday of this month. I’m excited.
  • School started back this week, and it will be my last semester. I have 3 classes left, two of which I’m taking this 8 weeks. After that, it’s one more 8 week class and I’m dooooooooooooone! Yay!
  • Lately, I’m getting frustrated with my Dexcom being really off. I didn’t have this problem before the new 505 upgrade, but it’s been more and more inaccurate. And, after reading Stacey’s post, I’m beginning to wonder if I may need to change meters. After all, it’s not a secret to me that the Verio isn’t very consistent when tested back-to-back. So I’ve ordered a Contour Next USB meter, which is supposed to work with Diasend (though not the Medtronic Link version of this), so I’ll update as soon as I know something… or at least within two weeks of testing and finding out things for myself.
  • Oh, and the news of Tandem’s t:flex gaining FDA approval this week was also pretty awesome as well. It’s their larger pump, the only one that can hold 480u per cartridge (but knowing what I know about my t:slim, I wonder if you’ll only have 430u available for use per cartridge since I tend to average about 50u loss per changeout). I think it’s great as I do love my t:Slim pump and have had a pretty good relationship with it over the past year or so since getting the whole bad cartridge thing behind me. I still hate the insulin waste, but on a daily basis and for my needs now, it fits perfectly into my “diabetic” life, and I’m happy with it. I can only be that much more excited that others who have needed a much larger capacity pump (some type 2’s, teens with type 1, and some preggo people) will now have an option to help them be able to use a pump without having to change out so frequently.

So, that’s about it. Not much going on, but a lot at the same time. I hope you all are doing well and are enjoying your January.

Updates: Bullet Point Style

It’s been almost a month since I posted. It’s crazy to think it’s been that long but at the same time, in my head, that was just last week. So much has been going on and I’ve basically just been concentrating on life than my blog, and I’m learning that that’s okay. I’ve been contemplating what to do about the situation… should I try to blog more? On a scheduled basis? But I’ve realized that I’m not a person who blogs based on schedules or requirements – I blog when I feel I have something to say or news to share. And, it may be that after 5 1/2 years that it may be time to slow down a bit. After all, I’m no person of authority or status to be sharing as if what I have to say or think is important – I just blog to blog. To get things out of my head. And I’m coming to grips with a lot of things lately in relation to diabetes and life, and diabetes blogging lately hasn’t made the top of the list…. it’s barely on the list, really.

Anyway, the updates I have are simply going to be bullet point style, because, honestly, there are a few topics that I’m just going to spit out randomly.

  • At the beginning of the month, I had a viral infection in my throat called “herpangina”. It’s the cousin to Hand, Foot, Mouth disease because both are caused by the same virus just different variations. It was painful, and I’m still – two weeks later – dealing with one big sore left in the back of my throat that’s taking a while to heal. The pain was awful in the beginning – and I could not eat anything that wasn’t a milkshake. 10665183_699683870117237_2650253020165325563_nNot even soup because it was too spicy (yes, soup!) and set me on fire. I sneezed at one point and thought my entire throat was going to come out. VERY very painful. I finally went to the doctor because I thought it may have been strep – but nope. He knew I was in a lot of pain, so he gave me a low-dose of prednisone to help the healing process. And, thankfully, the pain started to dull by that afternoon.
  • Speaking of prednisone, I now understand why doctors are cautious of giving diabetics steroids. Within 1 hour, my glucose readings went through the roof. But, the pain was easing, so I didn’t care. I raised my high threshold on my Dexcom, called my endo and asked how to handle the difference in BG’s (because, honestly, I didn’t feel like trying to troubleshoot on my own. I’m thankful to have a very good endo who has my back whenever I need him).
  • The prednisone gave me a new perspective on insulin resistance that was similar to how things were in my third trimester of my pregnancy, but without the worry of harming my unborn child. Seeing how I could go from a 1:8 carb ratio to one of 1:4 within 1 day and then have to remember that, yes, being off by just 2g of carb really COULD make a difference in my glucose later… yeah… it was nerve wracking, but so very cool at the same time. It was a learning experience, and one that made me feel even more compassion to those who deal with insulin resistance every day.
  • School is back in session, so my past weekend’s break was nice. And my BG’s were easier to control, so it made me realize just how stressed I’m staying while in school, and it makes graduating in May look that much better.
  • I finally have a treadmill. My husband promised we could get one for our anniversary, so we scouted and looked and finally came across one that was half-off and more within our budget range. It’s not a top-of-the-line gym model, but it will do for what we need, and for what we paid for it – I would have paid a 1-year gym membership, so we broke even there but the biggest advantage is that I can use it at home whenever I want/need to.
  • 1899983_705997876152503_6975308679029554123_nOn the topic of my t:slim and the Accu-chek Ultraflex infusion sets – I have been doing so much better with those verses the Insets that I loved so dearly. I have no idea for the reason, all I know is that it works. So, even though I don’t’ have the cool colors to choose from, I’m happy because I have been able to use my t:slim without issue.
  • And, lastly, my eyes. I went for my checkup about the swelling/edema from the macroaneurysm earlier this year and all of the swelling and fluid has resolved and my vision has gone back to normal in that eye. I do have some “hard exudates” (collections of cholesterol/fat stuff from the fluid) left, but he said those would resolve on their own, but much slower. I do have a few places that need to be watched just from simply having diabetes for almost 26 years, so I’ll continue to see him every 6 months from now on.

That’s about it.. Wraps everything up. I’m not sure how often I’ll be posting until the end of this month but I’ll be sure to try to post more next month since, you know, it’s National Diabetes Awareness Month and all 🙂

 

Also, starting on the 20th (that’s this coming Monday), the Big Blue Test restarts the counter for this year’s Big Blue Test challenge. Click HERE to find out more about it!!!